Tuesday, January 09, 2018

Wow, How Do I Work This?

Yes, a very long time.  Seems that the summer in Maine was so rough this year that I stopped reading.  Indeed, not a book was finished for 5 months. A long drought.

So, because of the new year and all that, I set a goal to read a book per week.  I was stymied in the very first week by the flu, of course, but I still finished the first book.

Manga Classics: Pride and Prejudice

Ok, so I went easy on myself.  I had the flu.

This retelling of the Austen classic isn't so bad.  If I knew some very young person who liked Manga and was curious, I'd pass it along.  But for someone who is either familiar with the story or has a more complete understanding of the historic era and/or mature emotions, eh, not so much.

In short, the story has been hugely streamlined. Stacy King, who adapted the novel for the Manga, really cut and condensed, in my opinion, far too much. All the social criticism, satire, and commentary of the original book is gone.  Much of the character nuance, depth, and complexity is gone (as well as a number of characters).  Women now seek to marry wealthy men because they are golddiggers.  A man who romances women in search of a fortune is just a horndog. And everything is Elizabeth's fault.

Yes, I think that was the most annoying part of the whole story for me -- the final chapters, in which Elizabeth and Darcy apologize to each other for past behaviors, come to understand each other, analyze their relationship and how it came to be, are all compressed into a kiss and some wedding images.  Darcy doesn't even apologize to Elizabeth at all for the manner of his first proposal or for the things he did and said when they first came to know each other.  He doesn't reveal his shyness and his retreat behind his position and power.  He's just the hero with some 'flaws' taped to his side.

Elizabeth's sharp, satirical eye and  tongue are also gone from the book. She's just a very pretty girl. Yes, it preserves the occasional quote, but the color and energy that make Elizabeth a favorite heroine are removed.  We don't need her observations in part because Manga is a symbolic, visual medium and the signs and clues she saw (and therefore we saw) in the original novel are now given to us in the language of Manga (in fact, if one is not familiar with Manga, I suspect the story will appear a little confusing).

Now, as Manga, it's quite enjoyable. Po Tse's artwork isn't 100% to my tastes, but in general I liked it very much.  The clothing was fairy true to the Regency period the novel is typically seen to be set in (although there are many historical indications that the novel was written during, and perhaps imaged by the author originally, in the Georgian period).  Scenery was nicely done and often included.  I can't fault the representations of the characters just because they didn't suite me so much.  I'd guess the artist has seen the A&E/BBC miniseries at least once based on the appearance of the characters.

Last of all, as a book to read while one has the flu, it was just about on level.  It took me a while to read only because of coughing, headaches, and the constant need to sleep.  In other circumstances, it would have been an hour or two, tops.


So, I have my next book picked out -- another easy read, a reread of Jim Butcher's Grave Peril, book 3 of the Dresden Files series which I had started rereading quite some time ago to refresh myself before diving into the last few books of the series.  My brain tapped out at some point, so I parked a marker in it and put it on the pile. As a post-flu recovery novel, should be an easy read.

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