Sunday, January 21, 2018

Book Review: Two Old Women

Two Old Women: An Alaska Legend of Betrayal, Courage, and Survival by Velma Wallis

I'm struggling to read, still, and since neither the third Dresden Files book or The Fire and the Fury seem able to hold my attention, I pulled this off my shelf and finished it.  It's a short little story.  The book itself is not even 150 pages and it's a small format with illustrations.  But as a retelling of a legend, it was enjoyable and interesting.  Not much else to say about it, really.  Lots to think about, though. 

The premise is that, during a particular hard winter, an indigenous Alaskan tribe makes the hard decision to leave behind two elderly women in order to help save the rest of the tribe.  It's done with much heartache and sadness, but it's the way The People have done for a long time whenever times were particularly tough.  Usually, though, the ones left behind were near death, or unable to do much for themselves anymore and thus a drain on the tribe.  These two old women have just sunk into the complaints and peculiar stasis of their age.  So, when left behind with two secret gifts -- a bundle of precious sinew and a hatchet -- they decide to fight for their own survival with the idea that rather than sit around waiting for death, they would die trying.

Their struggle is hard, but they draw on the knowledge and memories of their long lives and push their bodies to find a place that The People have forgotten and set up camp there.  They not only survive, but flourish.  And then The People come back looking for them after a long, terrible year. hoping to find them alive, and the repair of relationships must happen.

It is a moral tale, of course, as most legends are, about the value elders are to the younger, of the problems the elderly are prey to and how they can lose sight of their own value, and about the harshness of nomadic life in the far north.  It's a sweet story, and  rests upon a solid foundation of knowledge about what life was like (and, for many, still is like).  It is the sort of story that leaves an impression.

No comments: